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First Round Hires

Posted On April 23, 2013
Categories Hires

Courtney Anderson

2CI Award: Center for Health Equality Research

Legal Scholar
College of Law

Professor Anderson was a clinical fellow with the Housing and Community Development Clinic at the Harrison Institute at Georgetown Law.  She represents low-income tenant associations in purchasing, renovating, and converting multifamily housing into condominiums and cooperatives, and supervises clinical law students who work on these cases.  Prior to joining the Harrison Institute, Courtney worked in the real estate group at Sidley Austin LLP where her practice had an emphasis on corporate and financing transactions.

Erin Brown

2CI Award: Law, Policy, and Ethics in the Regulation and Governance of Health & Scientific Businesses

Assistant Professor
College of Law

Professor Brown’s research and teaching interests are in health law and policy, public health law, clinical research ethics and bioethics. Dr. Brown comes from Georgetown Law School and prior to that she practiced in the health care group at the San Francisco office of Ropes & Gray and she served as a law clerk for Judge Alan C. Kay on the U.S. District Court in the District of Hawaii. Fuse Brown graduated from Georgetown University Law Center and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health with a joint degree in law and public health.

Qian Gu

2CI Award: Chinese Studies

Assistant Professor
Institute of International Business
J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Dr. Gu’s research interests include corporate strategy, international management, institutional theory, family business, diversification and emerging economy, strategic management and international business. Dr. Gu received her B.A. in Finance from Wuhan University in 2006 and expects her Ph.D. in strategic management from National University of Singapore in June 2012.

Yaniv Heled

2CI Award: Law, Policy, and Ethics in the Regulation and Governance of Health & Scientific Businesses

Associate Professor
College of Law

Professor Heled teaches Intellectual Property Law, Patent Law, and Law and Emerging Technologies.  His research focuses on the intersection of law and the life sciences.  His current research includes an examination of the interplay between patent law and the regulation of biological pharmaceuticals and the ways in which executive agencies handle matters that address bioethical issues.  Prior to joining the College of Law, Professor Heled practiced intellectual property law at Goodwin Procter LLP.

Suri Iyer

2CI Award: Diagnostics

Associate Professor
Chemistry (Ctr. for Diagnostics & Therapeutics)
College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Suri S. Iyer is a synthetic chemist by training with research interests in glycoscience and biosensors. His graduate research focused on the development of chiral single site metal alkoxides for the ring opening polymerization of lactides and lactones. After receiving his Ph.D, he moved to Atlanta, Georgia to work for a surgeon, Dr. Elliot Chaikof, Emory School of Medicine where he synthesized complex glycans such as heparin/hyaluronan derivatives as potential anticoagulant biomaterials. In 2002, he moved to the Biosensor group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, where he worked on developing biosensors using glycans.

Shuai Li

2CI Award: Chinese Studies

Assistant Professor
Modern & Classical Languages (Chinese Studies)
College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Li coordinates Chinese classes and oversees the development of GSU’s Chinese program. In terms of research, Shuai is interested in understanding the development of second language (L2) pragmatic competence in instructed and uninstructed environments, with a primary focus on learners of Chinese as a second language. He has also examined the role of individual difference factors in the process of developing pragmatic competence in L2 Chinese. Other than that, he has surveyed the Confucius Institute Network in the U.S.

Didier Merlin

2CI Award: Diagnostics

Professor
Biology (Ctr. of Diagnostics & Therapeutics)
College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Merlin’s research includes inflammation such as intestinal Bowel Disease (IBD) specifically in the following parts: studying the role of PepT1 in intestinal inflammation; understanding the propagation of the intestinal inflammation that is mainly characterized by a loss of epithelial cell/cell interactions that result to a loss of the intestinal fence or barrier function; and the role of drug delivery in intestinal inflammation.

Ben Miller

2CI Award: New Media Studies

Assistant Professor
English
College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Miller works on the history and application of computational media to the problematic of individual and collective memory of traumatic events. His research investigates how new technologies were developed and applied to better tell stories of survival from both human atrocities, such as genocide in Cambodia and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, Guatemala, and Rwanda, and environmental catastrophes, such as the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. His current projects include a book on the history and future of collective, networked memory, Collective Magnetic Witness, a Natural Language Processing workbench for use on massive collections of human rights documents, and an archive of first-person videos from contemporary theatres of war.

Daniel Montanera

2CI Award: Law, Policy, and Ethics in the Regulation and Governance of Health & Scientific Businesses

Assistant Professor
Institute of Health Administration
J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Dr. Montanera’s research interests include health economics, public economics and microeconomic theory.  Dr. Montanera received his B.A. degree in economics and political science from King’s University College at the University of Western Ontario. He subsequently received his M.A. degree in Economics from Queen’s University and expects his Ph.D. in Economics in June 2012 from the University of Western Ontario.

Michael Price

2CI Award: Evidence-Based Policy

Associate Professor
Economics
Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Dr. Price’s research and teaching interests include behavioral economics, environmental economics, experimental economics, and industrial organization. Dr. Price comes from the University of Tennessee and prior to that he was an Assistant Professor in Economics at the University of Nevada.

Laura Francisca Salazar

2CI Award: Center for Health Equality Research

Associate Professor
Institute of Public Health

Dr. Laura F. Salazar focuses her research efforts on improving the sexual health of adolescents and adults, who are at heightened risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV. She is particularly interested in the intersection of the STI/HIV and gender-based violence (GBV) epidemics. Her intervention research has been funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health and includes the use of media and web-based approaches to expand the reach of health promotion.

Tim Sass

2CI Award: Evidence-Based Policy

Professor
Economics
Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Dr. Sass is an applied micro-economist whose current research focuses on the economics of education.  Specific areas of interest include teacher labor supply, the measurement of teacher quality and school choice.  His research has been supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Education, the Gates Foundation, the Smith-Richardson Foundation and the Spencer Foundation.  He has acted as a consultant to school systems in New York City, Washington, DC, Charlotte, NC and the State of Florida.  He is a senior researcher at the Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER) and serves on the board of directors of the Association for Education Finance and Policy.  Before coming to Georgia State in 2011, Sass was the Charles and Joan Haworth Professor of Labor Economics at Florida State University.

Andrew Wedeman

2CI Award: Chinese Studies

Professor
Political Science (Chinese Politics)
College of Arts & Sciences

Andrew’s research areas include Chinese Politics, Comparative Politics and Corruption. Dr. Wedeman was previously a professor of Political Science at University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He taught at the University Puget Sound and at the Hopkins Nanjing Center, the premiere bilingual post-graduate program in Sino-American Studies in China in 2006-2008. He was a visiting Fulbright Researcher at Taiwan National University in 2001-2002 and was a visiting research scholar at Beijing University in 2011. He received the Gordon White Prize for “The Intensification of Corruption in China” in The China Quarterly in 2004.

Stewart Ziff

2CI Award: New Media Studies

Associate Professor
Art & Design (Photography & Graphic Design)
College of Arts & Sciences

Professor Ziff’s background is both broad and varied having worked for over twenty five years as a practicing artist, as a systems professional in academia and industry, engaged with the technology of new media in both production and research oriented situations, and as a teacher of art and design with a base of experience as both an academic advisor and with classes in studio/critique, theory and the workflow of production. As an artist, Stewart has exhibited his work nationally and internationally, and has lived part time in Athens, Greece, where he helped manage and coordinate Personal Cinema, a non-profit arts organization he co-founded there that sought to promote peace and dialogue in the Balkans, bringing artists, writers and film-makers together from within it’s disparate environs through opportunities they developed for exhibition and collaborative exchange.

William Pridemore

2CI Award: Evidence Based Policy

Distinguished University Professor
Criminal Justice
Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Dr. Pridemore is the American Society of Criminology’s liaison to the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was the Founding Director of Indiana University’s Workshop in Methods. His main research interests include the (1) impact of social structure on homicide and suicide rates, (2) role of alcohol in violence and mortality, and (3) sociology of health and illness. Other research interests include violence and premature mortality in Russia, determining the effects of policy on outcomes like violence and health, rural criminology and sociology, the measurement of crime and deviance, and domestic terrorism.

Dr. Pridemore has been PI or co-PI on grants totaling more than $2.5 million, and his research has been funded by National Institutes of Health, National Council for Eurasian and East European Research, National Institute of Justice, and American Sociological Association/National Science Foundation.  His research is interdisciplinary and has been published in leading journals in several disciplines, including criminology (Criminology, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Justice Quarterly), public health and epidemiology (American Journal of Public Health, Addiction), and sociology (Social Forces, Social Science and Medicine, forthcoming in Annual Review of Sociology). He also edited a volume on law, crime, and justice in transitional Russia, which was published by Rowman & Littlefield, and recently co-edited (with Marieke Liem) a volume on European homicide research published by Springer.

Dr. Pridemore  received his PhD in 2000 from SUNY-Albany and spent a year as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard.  In 2008, he received the Junior Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association’s Section on Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco; in 2009 he received Indiana University’s Trustees Teaching Award; and in 2012 he received the Radzinowicz Memorial Prize for his research on poverty, inequality, and national homicide rates.

Jun Yin

2CI Award: Diagnostics

Associate Professor
Chemistry  
College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Yin graduated with a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Peking University in Beijing China in 1995. He worked on measuring the dissolution enthalpies of buckminsterfullerenes under the guidance of Professors Baohuai Wang and Youmin Zhang for his undergraduate thesis. He then went to the Rutgers University at New Brunswick to work with Dr. Stephen Anderson on the Aβ peptide aggregation in the Alzheimer’s disease. After receiving a M.S. degree in Chemistry from Rutgers in 1997, he went to work with Professor Peter G. Schultz at the Department of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley on engineering catalytic antibodies and elucidating their mechanisms of immunological evolution. He spent two years at Berkeley and four years at The Scripps Research Institute before graduating with a Ph.D. degree in Organic Chemistry from UC Berkeley in 2003. From 2003 to 2006, he was a postdoctoral fellow studying nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) in Professor Christopher T. Walsh’s group at the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He began his independent research in summer 2006 at the Department of Chemistry of the University of Chicago where he led his group to engineer enzymes to label and image cellular proteins, to elucidate the signal transduction pathways mediated by protein ubiquitination, and to expand the substrate specificities of NRPS enzymes to diversify the chemical structures of natural products. He became an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Center for Diagnostics & Therapeutics of the Georgia State University in summer 2013.